Findings of corrupt conduct

The ICAC found that John Hacking engaged in serious corrupt conduct by:

  • accepting from Scott Homsey $1,500 in March 2012 and $3,000 in September 2012, the receipt of which he knew would tend to influence him to exercise his official functions in favour of Mr Homsey
  • accepting $403,882 from Mr Homsey and Gay Homsey between November 2012 and February 2015, the receipt of which he knew would tend to influence him to exercise his functions in favour of Mr Homsey and which did influence him to exercise those functions by facilitating and concealing the undersupply of snack packs to the Rural Fire Service (RFS) and showing favour to Mr Homsey in relation to the business of the RFS
  • raising RFS purchase orders to Mr Homsey’s companies for snack packs and facilitating payment of Mr Homsey’s invoices between October 2012 and December 2014, knowing that the full amount ordered would not be supplied or had not been supplied to the RFS
  • taking mobile telephones and other electronic devices from the RFS without authority between March 2011 and December 2014.

The ICAC found that Scott Homsey engaged in serious corrupt conduct by:

  • paying $1,500 to Mr Hacking in March 2012 and $3,000 in September 2012, the receipt of which he knew would tend to influence Mr Hacking to exercise his official functions in favour of Mr Homsey
  • paying $403,882 to Mr Hacking between November 2012 and February 2015, the receipt of which he knew would tend to influence Mr Hacking to exercise his official functions in favour of Mr Homsey and which did influence him to exercise those functions by facilitating and concealing the undersupply of snack packs to the RFS and showing favour to Mr Homsey in relation to the business of the RFS
  • submitting invoices to the RFS for snack packs between October 2012 and December 2014, knowing that the full amount ordered had not been supplied or would not be supplied to the RFS, and knowing that payments had been made, or would be made, to a public official from the profit of the undersupply.

The Commission found that Gay Homsey engaged in serious corrupt conduct by:

  • assisting Mr Homsey to pay $38,000 to Mr Hacking in November 2012, the receipt of which she knew would tend to influence Mr Hacking to exercise his official functions in favour of Mr Homsey
  • assisting Mr Homsey to pay money to Mr Hacking between August 2014 and February 2015, knowing that the money was being paid as an inducement or reward for Mr Hacking exercising, or having exercised, his official functions in favour of Mr Homsey, by facilitating and concealing the undersupply of snack packs to the RFS.